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Monday, August 6, 2012

NY Times: Raising Successful Children

From the article:

 "Think back to when your toddler learned to walk. She would take a weaving step or two, collapse and immediately look to you for your reaction. You were in thrall to those early attempts and would do everything possible to encourage her to get up again. You certainly didn’t chastise her for failing or utter dire predictions about flipping burgers for the rest of her life if she fell again. You were present, alert and available to guide if necessary. But you didn’t pick her up every time.

You knew she had to get it wrong many times before she could get it right."

Also,

"There is an important distinction between good and bad parental involvement. For example, a young child doesn’t want to sit and do his math homework. Good parents insist on compliance, not because they need their child to be a perfect student but because the child needs to learn the fundamentals of math and develop a good work ethic. Compare this with the parent who spends weeks 'helping' his or her child fill out college applications with the clear expectation that if they both work hard enough, a 'gotta get into' school is a certainty. (While most of my parent patients have graduated from college, it is always a telltale sign of overparenting when they talk about how 'we’re applying to Columbia.')"

NY Times: Raising Successful Children-Madeline Levine

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